Posted by: papagiorgio200 | July 28, 2010

Benny Hinn and Paula White Caught In Affair?

Televangelist Benny Hinn, who resides behind gates in Dana Point and has a church and television studio in Aliso Viejo, and Without Walls International Church pastor Paula White of Florida have posted statements on their websites denying a report that they are romantically involved (OC Weekly).

…White was a self-proclaimed “messed-up Mississippi girl” growing up in Tupelo. Her father committed suicide when she was 5, and White’s website says she suffered “sexual and physical abuse” up until she was 13. White says her life changed when at 18 she received a “divine visitation.”

By 1991, she and then-husband Randy White were founding their own mega-church in Tampa.

The couple announced their divorce in 2007, after the church came under fire to failing to repay $170,000 borrowed from an elderly widow. The money, originally borrowed in 1995, was used as down payment on a house.

Randy stayed on with the ministry, now called Without Walls International Church.

Last year, however, Paula returned to that church’s pulpit, replacing Randy, who resigned citing ill health. At her first sermon, White told the congregants: “Mama is back.”…

…(read more)…

The question is this, while the National Enquirer often gets it wrong [they were correct, however, in regards to Jesse Jackson's and John Edward's affair], when pics like this hit the “press,” it is hard to deny:

VISIT OUR

Joni Eareckson Tada gave a discourse at Dallas Theological Seminary on disabilities and God. She talks of Christian compassion and refutes the Word of Faith vipers.
http://www.megavideo.com/?v=X4FG7Z3B

The fastest growing segment of professing Christianity in recent years has been among churches connected with the Positive Confession movement or Word-Faith movement (all part of the modern Charismatic movement). It has involved two distinct but closely related factions: the Norman Vincent Peale/Robert Schuller Positive-Possibility thinkers/Positive Mental Attitude, with their roots in New Thought; and the Kenneth Hagin/Kenneth Copeland Positive Confession and Word-Faith groups, which have their roots in E.W. Kenyon, William Branham, and the Manifest Sons of God/Latter Rain movement. Well-known names among its leaders are E.W. Kenyon, Charles Capps, Kenneth Hagin, Kenneth Copeland, Frederick K.C. Price, Robert Tilton, and David [Paul] Yonggi Cho. It does not yet constitute a new denomination, but it certainly represents innovative teachings outside of mainstream Christianity. The situation is so serious now because of the dominance over the so-called Christian media achieved by the teachers of Positive/Possibility Thinking and Positive Confession.

D.R. McConnell points out that “any new religious movement [within Protestantism] must bear the scrutiny of two criteria: biblical fidelity and historical orthodoxy.” Regrettably, the Positive Confession movement fails on both counts. The historical roots of this movement (which Charles Farah has called “Faith Formula Theology”) lie in the occult, and most recently, in New Thought and its off-shoot, the Mind Science cults. Its Biblical basis is found only in the peculiar interpretations of its own leaders, not in generally accepted Christian theology.

As the name “Positive Confession”/”Word-Faith” implies, this movement teaches that faith is a matter of what we say more than whom we trust or what truths we embrace and affirm in our hearts. The term “positive confession” refers to the teaching that words have creative power. What you say, Word-Faith teachers claim, determines everything that happens to you. Your “confessions,” that is, the things you say — especially the favors you demand of God — must all be stated positively and without wavering. Then God is required to answer. Word-Faith believers view their positive confessions as an incantation by which they can conjure up anything they desire: “Believe it in your heart; say it with your mouth. That is the principle of faith. You can have what you say” (Charismatic Chaos, pp. 281, 285).

This is at the heart of the Positive Confession movement today, also known as the “name-it-and-claim-it” gospel. The Positive Confession movement is nothing but a charismatic form of Christian Science. This can be substantiated by simply comparing the similarities in their common beliefs. Positive Confession is basically warmed-over New Thought dressed in evangelical/charismatic language. Positive Confession’s basic beliefs can be summarized as follows:

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Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 21, 2010

Ex-Word of Faith Testimony of Mike and Pat Rodgers

We apologize that this testimony would not format correctly making it difficult to read. It is easier to read here.

http://closing-stages.blogspot.com/2010/07/testimonial.html

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My wife Pat and I left the Defiance Ohio area and moved to Bellefontaine to start and build a church. That was six years ago, and now looking back I see that the whole time we were trying to build a church God was tearing us down. He was bringing us back to our foundational roots we didn’t even realize we had left. During the four years we pastured, a lot of the old convictions God had instilled in me as a young Christian, convictions I had let go, were resurfacing. This became a serious problem in our ministry as we were heavily influenced by Word of Faith ideology. Conflict began to rise up with our Ministry coverings. We were ordained by CMI (Calvary Ministries International) and Restoration Ministries. Frustration built within Pat and I over the lack of any real relational support and a constant pressure of supporting our coverings financially. To them we were indigenous, that is, on your own. Ultimately, we left both Ministries and became independent. Biblical conviction overruled, and we were left with some hard decisions. And almost immediately after withdrawing from the last covering God saw fit to place hard circumstances in our path that lead us to the decision to close the church.

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Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | July 17, 2010

VIDEO: Greg Koukl – What is faith?

Greg Koukl of Stand to Reason answers the question, “What is faith?” For more visit http://www.str.org.

Since the most basic heresy of the Word of Faith Movement is it’s redefinition of Faith, the topic that had arisen the most on our comments page is that of the question “What is Faith” and much of that has to do with the WoF sacred cow Mark 11:22-24. It is very important to clearly understand the biblical definition of faith. A right definition and false definition of faith is the dividing line between biblical Christianity and occultism wrapped in Christian terms.

I gathered a few articles that deals with this subject for visitors on our comments page. I thought I would gather all or most of the post on this blog that deal specifically with this subject and make a resource type post listing these resources.

*******VIDEOS*******

Here Jesse Duplantis teaches the WoF false defintion of faith by making the case that since “death and life” are in the power of the tongue he then concludes that we, not God, decide when to live or die.

Here is Joyce Meyers teaching this false definition of faith.

Greg Koukl of Stand to Reason answers the question, “What is faith?” For more visit http://www.str.org.

I think this video is probably the best resource on this subject from this blog. This video is part of groupblog author Pastor Jeff Klutts’s video and article series titled Wolves in Wool”

Wolves in Wool 3 – Faith, the Omnipotent Entity from Jeff Kluttz on Vimeo.


Pastor James Blocker Maranatha Tabernacle Queens, NY discuss how the Word of Faith teachers misdefine faith; and compares their teachings to the Word of God.

*******ARTICLES*******

Here is the first sermon groupblog author PapaG preached.

Faith In Faith

This is a list of commentary references on Mark 11:22-24 from PapaG

Some Commentary[ies] on Mark 11:23-24 (An Often Mis-Interpreted Verse By Word of Faithers)

This is from Norman Geisler and Ron Rhodes

MARK 11:23-24 – Did Jesus promise to give literally anything we ask in faith?

And I really like these articles

The Power of the Spoken Word – Biblical or Occult law? Part 1

The Power of the Spoken Word – Biblical or Occult law? Part 2

Abracadabra, Presto and SHAZAAM,, YOUR HEALED of your Word of Faith Delusion,,, because I SAY SO By Damon Whitsell

Winking, Wiggling and the Power of Words (A Word of Faith Movement Article)

Word Faith teaching- A spiritual copy of the Mind Sciences by LetUsReason

Understanding Mark 11:23 [can you have what you say?]

I HAVE WHAT I THINK AND SAY I HAVE (SPEAKING THINGS INTO EXISTENCE) by LetUsReason.org

The Fraudulent Faith of the Word of Faith Movement and Revivalism

Is Faith a Superpower?

Faith in God or “MY FAITH”

testimony
HOW I GOT FREE FROM THE WOLVES

My Testimony By Danny H. from FREEDOM FROM WOLVES

I was raised in a traditional Assemblies of God (Pentecostal) Church. I can remember going to tent meetings, like the ones on the Marjoe Documentary. (I wish I’d seen it sooner! But it wasn’t shown in the South when it was first aired.)

Before I go any further, I’d like to state that I hold no grudges or anger against any of my former churches, pastors, etc. Though I now realize I was in cultic churches, I know God has a way of working all of that mess out for good. (Rom. 8:28) Though I am no longer Pentecostal, I still have many Pentecostal friends and consider them to be brothers and sisters in Christ. I’m not anti-Pentecostal/Charismatic; I’m against the Word of Faith message.

Back to my story. I turned away from God around the age of 12. Fortunately, I returned to church at the age of 16. From about 16-20 was an exciting time in my life. I was a part of an active youth group. It was at this time that I was brought deeper into the Word of Faith message. It was slowly creeping into my A/G church and youth group. I bought my first Kenneth Hagin book and read it many times. My Youth Pastor taught the message and even stood before the entire congregation and claimed his healing from diabetes. To make a long story short, he was not healed and suffered great embarrassment.

As time passed, the church began to shift into the Prophetic Movement in the mid-1980’s. It was also in the mid-80’s that I began to question my Pentecostal beliefs for the first time. I read a book by Charles Ryrie called, Balancing the Christian Life. After reading the book, I left the Pentecostal Movement. Dr. Ryrie said, “Nowhere in the bible does it say that we are commanded to seek the baptism in the Spirit, nor does it say we should seek it.” (I’m paraphrasing.) I was told all my life that all Christians are commanded to seek the baptism. After digging and digging, I came to the conclusion that the Pentecostal message was wrong.

So, I left the Pentecostal church out of conviction, but could not find a good bible church in my area. The highlight of those years was when I met Christian author Bruce Barron, author of The Health and Wealth Gospel. I’m still acquainted with him today. His book helped cement my concerns about gross error in the church.

Read More…

Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 16, 2010

As The Scripture Has Said: by Closing Stages

We apologize that this article would not format correctly making it difficult to read and was removed for this reason. But it is a high quality article and I recommend following the link below to read it.


Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | July 15, 2010

VIDEO: Charles H. Spurgeon – On false teachers/false prophets

Beware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening wolves. Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit. A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit. Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them. Matthew 7:15-20

For I know this, that after my departing shall grievous wolves enter in among you, not sparing the flock. Also of your own selves shall men arise, speaking perverse things, to draw away disciples after them. Therefore watch, and remember, that by the space of three years I ceased not to warn every one night and day with tears. And now, brethren, I commend you to God, and to the word of his grace, which is able to build you up, and to give you an inheritance among all them which are sanctified. Acts 20:29-32

Now the Spirit speaketh expressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, giving heed to seducing spirits, and doctrines of devils; 1 Timothy 4:1

Let no man beguile you of your reward in a voluntary humility and worshipping of angels, intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind, colossians 2:18

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-92) was England’s best-known preacher for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. In 1854, just four years after his conversion, Spurgeon, then only 20, became pastor of London’s famed New Park Street Church (formerly pastored by the famous Baptist theologian John Gill). The congregation quickly outgrew their building, moved to Exeter Hall, then to Surrey Music Hall. In these venues Spurgeon frequently preached to audiences numbering more than 10,000—all in the days before electronic amplification. In 1861 the congregation moved permanently to the newly constructed Metropolitan Tabernacle.

This Video is part of groupblog author Pastor Jeff Klutts’s video and article series titled “Wolves in Wool”. I think this video is probably the best resource on the subject of “What is Faith” from this blog. Jeff not only exegetes the meaning of faith from several biblical passages, he also deals with about a dozen or so quotes from Word of Faith teachers on the subject of faith.

I cannot say enough about the quality of teaching that Jeff has shared with this blog and it’s visitors. You will be extremely blessed if you visit Jeffs RETURNINGKING.COM.

Jeff has turned two of his teaching series into books. The Returning King and Spirit World. And since the books are essentially his article series, both books are available for FREE READING. And he is now finishing up the book Wolves in Wool which comes from his article and video series that is on this blog. Jeff is currently doing two new video series called “The Gospel Truth” and “Interpreting the Bible“. He also has a couple of other completed video teaching series.

And you can watch these teaching series as they are streamed live at  

Which is essentially an online TV channel for services at the church Jeff pastors, First Baptist Church Needville TX, USA – www.fbcneedville.org

As you can see there are many reasons to visit and bookmark Jeff’s blog RETURNINGKING.COM.

I have really enjoyed brother Jeffs teachings. I hope you do also. Jeff really does a good job on the subject of Faith in the following video.

Wolves in Wool 3 – Faith, the Omnipotent Entity from Jeff Kluttz on Vimeo.

Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | July 15, 2010

VIDEO: What is the Gospel? Is the Gospel the Word of Faith?

“They’.. label the ‘Word of faith’ as a ‘movement’…but the Gospel is the Word of Faith..according to the Apostle Paul”

This is part of a comment I received at YouTube. You can see the larger quote and my article and video response to this claim here.

We must be careful when we read. This statement is evidence of this. It would be totally correct to say “The Word of Faith is the Gospel”. But to say “the Gospel is the Word of Faith” is rank heresy and a total inversion and perversion of what Scripture teaches.

This video clearly portrays the Gospel. ALL OF THE GOSPEL. (ie. the “Full Gospel”).

Q&A with Alan Cairns are brief, straightforward, Bible-based, video answers presented in a conversational format that deal with a broad range of difficult questions that face Christians today

Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 14, 2010

Joel Osteen’s La Vi Da Loca! by Acidri’s Blog

When talk show host Oprah Winfrey so much as spits on a book it immediately catches fire. The ashes can so much as sell for a lump sum that can earn you enough money for  an early retirement. In 2006 an Australian Rhonda Byrne got much more than she bargained for when she wrote the New Age self help book, The Secret.  Her book did not get spat on. No. The book got featured not once but twice on the Oprah Winfrey show and (wait for this) by the Spring of 2007 the book had sold almost 4 million copies, and the DVD had sold more than 2 million copies. Byrne was listed among Time Magazine’s list of 100 people who shaped the world in 2007.

Byrne writes, “Disease cannot live in a body that is in a healthy emotional state.” But be warned: “If you have a disease and you are focusing on it and talking to people about it, you are going to create more disease cells.” The tenet of the book is that an individual’s focused positive thinking can result in life-changing results such as increased wealth, health, happiness and more.

Wait a minute that sounds so much like Word of Faith you say. Isn’t that what modern day evangelicals are doing these days? The health, wealth and prosperity gospel is synonymous with the Word of Faith theology which is perhaps the fastest brand of Christianity with about 147 million followers in Africa (according to Christianity Today magazine). They make up more than a fourth of Nigeria’s population, more than a third of South Africa’s, and a whopping 56 percent of Kenya’s.

“One of the greatest distinguishing marks of a false prophet is that he will always tell you what you want to hear, he will never rain on your parade, he will get you clapping, he will get you jumping, he will make you dizzy, he will keep you entertained, & he will present a Christianity to you that will make your church look like a Six Flags over Jesus.” -Paul Washer

Through faith and positive confession, so goes the ideology, we can obtain anything we want — health, wealth, success, or whatever we please. The formula is simply: “Say it, Do it, Receive it, and Tell it.” Rhonda on the other hand explains that this New Age technique is the law of attraction, which is the principle that “like attracts like.” Rhonda calls it “the most powerful law in the universe.” The principle is that we create our own circumstances by the choices we make in life. And the choices we make are fuelled by our thoughts—which means our thoughts are the most powerful things we have here on earth.

Word of faith allegations are heretical and differ from Biblical orthodoxy. God wants you to be rich is the mantra. “He [also] wants His children to eat the best, He wants them to wear the best clothing, He wants them to drive the best cars, and He wants them to have the best of everything.”  ”That’s the reason why I drive a Rolls Royce,” boasts a mega church pastor.

Read More…

Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 14, 2010

The Error of a Prosperity Gospel by Gospel Assembly Church

God gave the continent of Africa to Brother Lloyd Goodwin. By that, I mean that he was the first true man of God, from the corporal-corporate body of Christ, to come to Africa for nearly 2000 years. He stepped into a hotel conference room in a Nairobi hotel in 1978 and began to blast out a foundation of truth and New Testament order.

That was nearly thirty years ago. Some may decide to leave that foundation. They might not tell you they are doing so, but if they preach something different, and conduct their services after a different order, then they have moved off the foundational teachings of this body. Yet the foundation of the Lord standeth sure, having this seal, the Lord knoweth those who are His. II Timothy 2:19. For the body of Christ to continue to operate, and to grow, we must continue to build upon the right foundation. Paul said in I Corinthians 3:11, “No other foundation can be laid.” And truly, no other foundation can build the true body of Christ, than the foundation laid in this continent nearly 30 years ago. Ephesians 2:20 says that the true work of God is to be built on the foundation of apostles, prophets, and Jesus Christ.

Now, 30 years down the road, a new gospel has been brought to this continent. It did not originate in the body of Christ, and we do not want it to contaminate the body of Christ. It is a prosperity gospel preached by a fast-growing Pentecostal movement.

In fact, prosperity-tinged Pentecostalism is the fasting growing religion in Africa, growing even faster than Islam. Of the 890 million people in Africa, 147 million are now what they call “renewalists.” That figure is from a 2006 study from the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. The term, “renewalist,” includes both Pentecostals and charismatics. Renewalists make up more than one-fourth of Nigeria’s population, more than one-third of South Africa’s population and an amazing 56% of Kenya’s population. This growth of religion is nothing short of astounding.

Read More…

Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 14, 2010

Two New Ex-Word of Faith Websites

THE LIST IS GROWING!!! There are two new websites from Ex-Word of Faith Movement followers. We have added them to our blogroll and would like to feature them to the readers of this blog.

1.  Freedom from Wolves

Danny is currently writing his testimony to be posted on his blog and our Testimony Page

2. ITCHING EARS

Kevin has a website on Freewebs. You can already view Kevin’s Testimony here on this blogs Testimony Page.

Please give these guys a visit and a shoutout to let them know they are appreciated for sharing their experiences in the WoF movement with us.

May God richly bless you, Danny and Kevin

THANKS

There is a new youtube channel and blog ministry called saffron planet. They did a really good video interview of Justin Peters It is supposed to be a 10 part series but they loaded up four videos in a few weeks and have not posted any more since. I really, really liked this interview,, it is good to get to see Justin as he speaks and interacts with the interviewers.If they add more video for this series, I will make another post.

Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 13, 2010

Can we be equal with God? An Exegesis of Philippians 2:5-6

I have been participating in debates over at the CARM Mormon (LDS) Forum. This is a study done by THEO. Although this study is addressed to Mormons, it also addresses the way WoFers take Philippians 2:5-6 and other verses out of context to try to say that they are also Gods. At least Mormons only believe they are “gods in embryo”. This study does an excellent job of showing how Philippians 2:5-6 does not support the ideas of plural Gods/gods. Damon

Proper Exegesis

I think it goes without saying that Mormons can’t do exegesis. They “proof-text” their way around the Bible, using maybe (at best) one or two verse from any given book of the Bible, without any regard to their contextual meaning. This may be partly due to deception on their part, but I believe it is largely due to the fact that they have no experience with exegesis. They have a “lay ministry”, so their leaders (eg. stake presidents) aren’t taught how to do it, and their top leaders (eg. Monson, Packer) don’t do it by example, to show them how it’s done. (I would actually be interested in the perceptions of ex-Mormons about when and how they eventually learned to exegete texts of Scripture.

What is fascinating is that most people understand how to read written texts, such as books, letters, newspaper articles, blogs, discussion forum posts, and so on. But it seems to me that “Scripture” has a particular “stigma” to it, that one thinks that it’s an exception to the rule of starting from the beginning, and following a thought or line of argument from start to finish. Of course, this concept may be enabled due to the ideas of some who think God is “speaking to them” if they open up a Bible to a random page, and blindly point their finger to a particular verse. It is also “encouraged” by those who use Scripture citations as supporting their doctrines, when those reading the citations might not realize that the meaning of a particular verse is contingent on understanding the verse in its overall passage.

Fortunately, it is frequently necessary only to know the teachings of the Bible, and the methods of proper exegesis, to be able to demonstrate the inappropriate use of “proof-texts” by Mormons. Case in point:

A Favourite “Proof-Text”

Mormons often use Phil. 2:5-6 to try to support the Mormon blasphemy of “exaltation”:

Philippians 2:5: Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus:
Philippians 2:6: Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God:

The attempted proclamation is clear:

1) Christ thought it “not robbery” (ie. justified) to be equal with God;
2) We are to have the “like mind” of Christ;
3) Therefore we should think we can/should be equal with God;

But when we need to address this “proof-text” argument, we need to consider a number of pertinent points:

Read More…

I have been participating in debates over at the CARM Mormon (LDS) Forum. This is a study done by THEO. Although this study is addressed to Mormons, it also addresses the way WoFers take 1 Cor. 8:5 and other verses out of context to try to say that they are also Gods. At least Mormons only believe they are “gods in embryo”. This study does an excellent job of showing how 1 Cor. 8:5 does not support the ideas of plural Gods/gods. Damon

A common “proof-text” Mormons use to try to prove their polytheism, or “plural gods” doctrine, is that of 1 Cor. 8:5:

1 Cor. 8:5 … there be gods many, and lords many …

But as we saw in the Phil. 2:5-6 thread, we will also see here that Mormons simply ignore the contextual content of the passage in trying to misrepresent Scripture to try to make it conform to their false doctrines. In fact, I would assert that one only needs to read the entire chapter, beginning at verse 1, to see the fallacious nature of the Mormon argument.

We will look at the following:

1) The overall theme of 1 Cor. 8;
2) The nature of the “gods many” according to verse 5;
3) The contrasting teaching Paul gives in light of “gods many and lords many”;
4) The overall teaching of monotheism in the Bible
5) A comparison with the Jewish Sh’ma, Deut. 6:4

The Theme of 1 Cor. 8

I Cor 8:1: Now as touching things offered unto idols, we know that we all have knowledge. Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.
I Cor 8:2: And if any man think that he knoweth any thing, he knoweth nothing yet as he ought to know.
I Cor 8:3: But if any man love God, the same is known of him.
I Cor 8:4: As concerning therefore the eating of those things that are offered in sacrifice unto idols, we know that an idol is nothing in the world, and that there is none other God but one.
I Cor 8:5: For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods many, and lords many,)
I Cor 8:6: But to us there is but one God, the Father, of whom are all things, and we in him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, by whom are all things, and we by him.
I Cor 8:7: Howbeit there is not in every man that knowledge: for some with conscience of the idol unto this hour eat it as a thing offered unto an idol; and their conscience being weak is defiled.
I Cor 8:8: But meat commendeth us not to God: for neither, if we eat, are we the better; neither, if we eat not, are we the worse.
I Cor 8:9: But take heed lest by any means this liberty of yours become a stumblingblock to them that are weak.
I Cor 8:10: For if any man see thee which hast knowledge sit at meat in the idol’s temple, shall not the conscience of him which is weak be emboldened to eat those things which are offered to idols;
I Cor 8:11: And through thy knowledge shall the weak brother perish, for whom Christ died?

I think it is fair to say that when something (“idols”) is mentioned seven times in one chapter, it is a candidate for being the main “theme” of the passage. Paul is clearly speaking of idols, and in particular whether it is okay to eat meat which has been sacrificed to idols. In effect, the question is whether such meat has “idol-cooties”, or whether it makes you associated with the idols the meat came from. That is the context of “gods many and lords many”, the existence of a world full of “idols”, false gods.

So the mere mention of “there be gods many” in a passage speak of idols hardly is supporting evidence for polytheism, or “plural gods”, the existence of multiple true gods.
Read More…

You must hear this song and share it with friends and church leaders. The worldly values of American materialism and greed are behind the prosperity doctrines of demons!

I seen this song a long time ago and thought it was on this blog,,, but I was wrong. So here it is. It is a good one.

 

FROM THE VIDEO DESCRIPTION:

You MUST hear this song! A powerful song and teaching that gives you a serious warning concerning false teachers and their ungodly dangerous doctrines. You should listen to holy men of God who preach the truth from a sincere heart.THIS SONG IS FROM THE CD “CONSIDER THE COST” BY STEVE CAMP.I CONSIDER IT ONE OF HIS BEST.

The following book is a very good book to read on the subject it is called “The Agony of Deceit” by Michael Horton. The song is based on this book and 2 Peter 2. You can order this book on Amazon.com or ebay.

If you are a serious Christian and want to know the truth about this Movement consider buying these books.

You can find these books on amazon.com

1. “A Different Gospel” by D.R. McConnell
2. “The New Charismatics” by Michael Moriarty
3. “Christianity in Crisis” by Hank Hanegraaff
4. “The Seduction of Christianity” by Dave Hunt
5.” The Word-Faith Controversy” by Robert Bowman
6. “The Born Again Jesus of the Word-Faith Teaching” by Judith Matta
7. “The Strange World of Benny Hinn”
8. The Disease of the Wealth and Health Gospel” Gorden Fee (A renown godly Pentecostal Bible scholar).

If fact there is no church historian or Bible Scholar that would agree with these false teachings. I know this movement well. I graduated from Rhema Bible Training Center in 1979 and spent 12 long years as a part of this movement. I preached in many WOF Churches. I was a devout reader of E.W. Kenyon. I read one of his books over 40 times! I met and heard many of the key figures of this movement in the ’70s and 80s. So I’m not a novice on the subject. God by His grace set me free from these false doctrines in 1988. At the time I was a pastor of a growing church. I recanted before my congregation. The Bible became like a new book to me, so precious, pure and powerful. Since then I’ve been on the narrow road that leads to life. I now preach the Gospel as according to Jesus and the Apostles as inspired by the Holy Spirit. Finally, let it be said that not all pentecostals agree with the Word of Faith Movement. God bless you.

Even though I have been negatively affected by other Cults and false teachings, since before I knew what a Cult and False teaching was, I am going to use MY WORDS TO HEAL those deluded by the WoF movement. Because the WoF teaching that faith is a force is not only a false teaching, But also A VERY DANGEROUS and sometimes deadly OCCULTIC PARADIGM SHIFT.

So I have decided (willed) to USE THE POWER OF MY WORDS to heal you. I will be constantly Chanting YOUR HEALED,YOUR HEALED, YOUR HEALED. So don’t make any negative confessions, least Thee over power my positive confessions, JUST RECEIVE AND BE HEALED.

You know I am just joking, being sarcastic and a little facetious right

But If I weren’t, think of the ramifications of the idea that words have magical creative power.
We hear Word of Faith believers say “Life and death is in the power of the tongue” BUT THAT DON’T MEAN that actions don’t have consequences, AND WORDS are more powerful than WHAT WE DO, and sometimes think. Just think how delusional and illogical the idea is that words have more power than our actions do. The first thing we learn as a Kid is that actions have consequences. If we stick our finger in the fire, we find the fire is HOT, not because someone SAID FIRE IS HOT, but because fire is hot by it’s nature. As a baby,,, we cannot even understand our parents say the fire is Hot. And fire was hot WAY BEFORE cavemen quit grunting and grumbling and started talking. And we usually don’t find the real power in words until we use the wrong words, on the wrong people,,, and get a bop on the nose for it. Our words have some power, but not literal creative power.

And certainly God could have created everything,,, without a single word, because He IS GOD. THE Creator.

Man has never created anything Ex-nihilo (out of nothing), much less with mere words. Although words can uplift, encourage and build self esteem, and our words can insult, degrade and devalue a person. Words have never actually killed anyone. It is impossible to die from saying “I am laughing myself to death”

Have you ever noticed that ALL BRIDGES ARE SLIPPERY WHEN WET? Even if they don’t have a warning sign saying so. OR SOMEBODY SAID SO. Have you ever noticed that in contradiction against the obvious implications of the Word of Faith teaching,,, speaking impaired people get sick and have problems that RESULT FROM THEIR ACTIONS,,,,, not lack of words?

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John Edwards is the owner of the blog http://junkerjorge1.blogspot.com/, which is now also found on Johns http://faithpreacher.com domain. John is an Ex-Word of Faith Pastor who is now a reformed Calvinist and blogs about his 14 years of WoF experince, both living it and teaching it. I highly recommend reading Johns blog, especially if your trying to find your way out of the WoF.

This post is about Johns first Blog that was imported to this blog when it first started, about 150 post or so. I think Johns earlier writings are his best, most transparent and open when sharing. I really urge you to take the time to read some of  the post from Johns first blog here. These post ARE NOT available anywhere else on the internet as John deleted that blog after me and him founded this groupblog.

When these post where imported to this blog the tags and categories did not transfer correctly. So these post did not get picked up by the search engines like they should so they have gotten only a small amount of hits here. That means that not many people have seen these post in quite sometimes, including John.

So I hope some of you will take the time to read these post from the original FAITHPREACHER Blog. Although John is not a groupblog author here anymore, he was vital in the founding of this blog, we remain friends and (again) I highly recommend reading these first post from John. The first couple of dozen post are found on his new blog, but well over 100 are exclusive to this blog.

Here is the link, I hope you enjoy

http://thewordonthewordoffaithinfoblog.com/category/john-edwards/

This post is a portion of an Assemblies of God Position Paper called The Believer and Positive Confession. In the Position Paper, the second largest pentecostal denomination formally declares it’s doctrinal stance and responds to the extremes in the Word of Faith Movement. Therefore the whole Position Paper is well worth reading.

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Believers Should Recognize They Can Expect Suffering in This Life.

The positive confession teaching advocates reigning as kings in this life. It teaches that believers are to dominate and not be dominated by circumstances. Poverty and sickness are usually mentioned among the circumstances over which believers are to have dominion.

If believers choose the kings of this world as models, it is true they will seek the trouble-free life (although even kings of this world are not free from problems). They will be more concerned with physical and material prosperity than with spiritual growth.

When believers choose the King of kings as their model, however, their desires will be completely different. They will be transformed by His teaching and example. They will recognize the truth of Romans 8:17 which is written concerning joint-heirs with Christ: “If so be that we suffer with him, that we may be also glorified together.” Paul even went so far as to glory in his infirmities instead of denying them (2 Corinthians 12:5-10).

Though Christ was rich, for our sakes He became poor (2 Corinthians 8:9). He could say, “The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head” (Matthew 8:20).

While God in His providence has endowed some with the ability to accumulate greater wealth than others, something is tragically lacking if there is not a willingness to do the will of God and surrender all, if need be, including creature comforts.

Jesus never ceased to be God, and through the power of the Holy Spirit performed many miracles; yet He was not free from suffering. He knew He must suffer many things of the elders (Matthew 16:21; 17:12). He desired to eat the Passover with the disciples before He suffered (Luke 22:15). After His death, the disciples recognized that Christ’s suffering was a fulfillment of prophecy (Luke 24:25, 26, 32).

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Visit this post to see pictures of the Osteens new mansion

PICTURES of Joel Osteen’s 10.5 Million Dollar River Oaks Mansion

At Lakewood Church, Joel Osteen proclaims,”It’s God’s will for you to live in prosperity instead of poverty.” The pastor of the Houston megachurch and wife Victoria certainly practice what they preach.

The couple has moved to a $10.5 million mansion in River Oaks, while keeping their former Tanglewood residence, valued at $2.9 million.

They are, however, selling a vacant lot next to their former home. Asking price for the half-acre property at the corner of Doliver and Sherbrooke: $1.1 million. Martha Turner Properties has the listing.

The lot is marked by an ivy-covered wall that adjoins the 5,600-square-foot, four bedroom home. When the land is sold, the property will be divided.

In a sign that the Houston real estate market remains soft at the high end, the Tanglewood lot was first offered for sale at an asking price of $1.4 million last August. The price was dropped to $1.299 million in December and to $1.1 million last month.

Several months ago, the couple and their children moved to a 17,000-square-foot stone mansion in the Tall Timbers subdivision in River Oaks. The Osteens’ new home is situated on 1.86 acres and surrounded by an ornamental fence. The 411: It has six bedrooms, six bathrooms, three elevators and five wood-burning fireplaces, with a one-bedroom guest house and pool house. The Harris County Appraisal District valued it at $10.5 million.

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No, the Assemblies of God and the Word of Faith are not the same.  They are two separate organizations.

The Word of Faith movement emerged within Charismatic/Pentecostal Christianity in the latter 20th century. The Word of Faith movement as a whole has no formal organization or authoritarian hierarchy, though the movement does have a number of high-profile teachers who heavily influence Word of Faith theology. It’s basic theology is a peculiar mix of orthodox Christianity and mysticism.

Kenneth Hagin (who I believe is no longer living) is often referred to as the “father” of the Word of Faith movement, but in reality it was Phineas Parkhurst Quimby (1802-1866) who laid the foundations. It was Quimby’s metaphysical teachings that influenced E.W. Kenyon, and it was E.W. Kenyon’s teachings that in turn influenced Kenneth Hagin. Most prominent Word of Faith teachers today draw their inspiration from Kenneth Hagin.

The “force” of faith, an unbiblical view of faith, is the foundation of Word of Faith theology. Proponents believe they can use words to manipulate the faith-force, and thus actually create what they believe Scripture promises (health, wealth, etc.). Laws supposedly governing the faith-force are said to operate independently of God’s sovereign will — God Himself being subject to the “laws” of faith.

The Assemblies of God is the second largest Pentecostal group in the United States and the largest Pentecostal organization in the world.  In the United States the Church of God In Christ is the largest Pentecostal group.  The Assemblies of God would official reject “Word of Faith” teaching but many of it’s churches do network with Word of Faith teachers.

For a compresensive look at what the Assemblies of God believes I suggest you visit their website at http://www.ag.org and brouse through the beliefs section.  There are many articles there that you should find interesting.  Especially their “position paper” section which sets forth their difference with some of the newer “Charastimatic” groups including the Word of Faith. (the Position paper is linked HERE for your convenience)

Blessings
Terry Wiles

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Pentecostals-2256/Assemblies-God-Word-Faith.htm

Special treatment is given to those who have deep pockets and we see evidence of this in some “money hungry” churches as some critics like to call them. The prosperity gospel is often preached when leaders of the church claim that God told them to buy property and build something that glorifies him. However, there is a fine line between hearing from God and hearing from self. Some ministers allow their minds and hearts to confuse the two. Sometimes God has told them to construct a building or create an additional program, but they may have the timing all wrong. The there are those times that God didn’t tell them to do anything but be still; however, selfish reasons, a demanding church board, or simply greed can spoil a good pastor if he isn’t too careful. So what exactly do some churches do to pressure believers to reach deeper in their pockets until it hurts?

Often make comments, preach or teach about giving. Some will do this to the point that it turns visitors off. Many already know about giving, but haven’t felt the need to give to the church because they aren’t completely convinced that they want to make it their church home. Just as one will have to get to know a person before they walk down the aisle and marry their mate, visitors have to know whether or not they want to walk down the aisle and commit to the church. It may only take months are many years before they hand over something as near and dear to them as their money.

Church leaders orchestrate specific plans to get you to give more. What many people who know nothing about what goes on behind the scenes of the Sunday program don’t know is that there is usually a group of people who meet about more than just what the choir will sing and what the pastor will preach about, but they specifically choose certain music and biblical teachings to get you to give more. If the church needs a new roof, the leadership may find scriptures related to giving, building, and assistance. He or she may also use life examples that will make you say to yourself, “I remember feeling the same stress when I had to buy a roof for my house, I think I will give.” The pastor may have trouble trying to get a program started or an old building resurrected so he may be told by the church board to come up with something to get members to give more. The bottom line is the priority is to get you to give, but if you get something out of what has been taught to you then that is just icing on the cake.

There are certain songs, corporate fasts, and revivals that are generated to evoke the emotions of those who attend the church. If you are made to feel guilty, sad, elated, or encouraged, you may be more likely to feel obligated to give to get something in return. That is why the prosperity gospel is so popular because ignorant visitors who don’t read the Bible will assume that al they have to do is give God some cash and everything will be alright because his messenger said so.

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Law of Attraction or Divine ATM?

Would you believe me if I told you that right now there are people in this world who are constructing make-believe World War II airstrips and via elaborate rituals seek to entice the dropping of cargo – such as was the norm during that war when American GIs were supplied via airdropped cargo shipments on remote islands and outposts while the fighting was raging?

In a day and age of the Internet, television, and even just plain radio technology this seems to be an entirely fictitious notion, but not so! There is indeed on the island of Tanna (located in the South Pacific) a still operating cargo cult which reveres a mythical deity known as John Frum (a term anthropologists believe to stem from the way GIs may have introduced themselves to the villagers’ ancestors, i.e. “Hi, I’m John from America”). The BBC reported in February of 2007 about the parades the island’s young men hold, many of which carry wooden weapons painted with the letters USA.

The goal of the parades and worship is the wished for and much anticipated return of the mythical John Frum who is said to then bring them abundant wealth and also happiness.

Understanding the Prosperity Gospel

The prosperity gospel – also known as prosperity theology, the law of prosperity, and “the secret” – is a belief system that is common within certain Christian charismatic congregations but also heavily favored in the new thought movement.

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Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 2, 2010

Prosperity Preaching: Deceitful and Deadly By John Piper

When I read about prosperity-preaching churches, my response is: “If I were not on the inside of Christianity, I wouldn’t want in.” In other words, if this is the message of Jesus, no thank you.

Luring people to Christ to get rich is both deceitful and deadly. It’s deceitful because when Jesus himself called us, he said things like: “Any one of you who does not renounce all that he has cannot be my disciple” (Luke 14:33). And it’s deadly because the desire to be rich plunges “people into ruin and destruction” (1 Timothy 6:9). So here is my plea to preachers of the gospel.

1. Don’t develop a philosophy of ministry that makes it harder for people to get into heaven.

Jesus said, “How difficult it will be for those who have wealth to enter the kingdom of God!” His disciples were astonished, as many in the “prosperity” movement should be. So Jesus went on to raise their astonishment even higher by saying, “It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.” They respond in disbelief: “Then who can be saved?” Jesus says, “With man it is impossible, but not with God. For all things are possible with God” (Mark 10:23-27).

My question for prosperity preachers is: Why would you want to develop a ministry focus that makes it harder for people to enter heaven?

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Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | July 2, 2010

VIDEO: TEXE MARRS The Blind & The Dead

Exposed!—Benny Hinn, Paul and Jan Crouch, Steve Brock, Steve Hill, John Avanzini, Kenneth Copeland, Kenneth Hagin, Rodney Howard-Browne, and a host of other famous-name “Christian” televangelists and charismatic leaders. You’ll be shocked, stupefied, appalled, disgusted, and saddened all in one as you watch the outrageous antics of well-known Christian celebrities and their untold thousands of gullible followers.

You’ll shake your head in dismay as you see men barking like dogs and being led around on leashes; women howling like wolves and braying like donkeys; and profanity shouted from the pulpit. You’ll recoil in astonishment to discover supposed Christian leaders scoffing at Bible doctrine; a televangelist and his associates sharing an opium smoking pipe; possessed people slithering like serpents at crusades; and thousands of worshippers blasphemously speaking in false tongues and breaking out in roaring, hysterical laughter…

Posted by: Damon Whitsell | July 2, 2010

Joel Osteen’s Church Has a Wide Door by Kyle Mori

And it Leads to Destruction

Before I begin, I want to explain where I am coming from. I am a pursuer of a Christ-like life, and believe Jesus is the true Son of God who died to pay the punishment for my (and everyone else’s) sins. I do not hate Joel Osteen, or believe he is the devil (which I’ve heard). I think it’s childish to draw little red horns on top of his photograph (which I’ve seen). I do not think he is doing what he is doing to get rich or become famous. I believe he thinks he is helping people, which is fine but to label what he teaches as “Christianity” is pure blasphemy. I have watched many of his sermons, interviews, but have not read his book (though I’ve read summaries). I do not have a problem with him not attending seminary, though I think it would have been better for him after how he warps the Bible. I am praying for the day when Mr. Osteen realizes what he preaches is not the complete Christian gospel, and shares that truth with his audience because, hey, he has the biggest church in America.

(Throughout the article I will not write out any Bible verses, but refer to them by book, chapter and verse. The point of this is to get people to open a Bible before trying to argue their points.)

Basically, Joel Osteen preaches what some have dubbed the, “prosperity gospel.” It basically emphasizes that if you follow God good things will happen to you, such as being successful Financially and career-wise. Osteen once preached, “because of the price He (Jesus) paid, we have a right to total victory…not partial victory, to where we have a good family, we have good health, but we constantly struggle in our finances. That’s not total victory.”  Nowhere in the Bible does it say that Jesus died so we can have a family, be healthy, and financially stable! On the contrary, Jesus’ death was so that we, sinners, may have life after the one in this world ends! We should not live this life for our own desires and securities, but in complete and utter sacrifice to God that puts our health and finances, things of ourselves, in danger! (2 Corinthians 5:14-15) Many people in this country want to learn about a God that only hopes we are happy, they don’t want to hear the God that condemns (the God Jesus talked about!). The way Joel Osteen describes God sounds more like he is talking about Santa Claus, think happy thoughts, be good, and he’ll reward you with worldly things. (1 John 2:15) Another Osteen sermon quote: “It’s God’s will for you to live in prosperity instead of poverty. It’s God’s will for you to pay your bills and not be in debt. It’s God’s will for you to live in health and not in sickness all the days of your life.” Where does it say this in the Christian Bible? (Revelation 3:17) Paul, the post-Christ world’s first great evangelist lived in poverty and with some type of physical ailment. He, as well as many other disciples of Jesus, sacrificed their lives in hope that the TRUE gospel of Jesus Christ may be heard! They endured physical abuse, stoning, and poverty. Look at the way Jesus himself lived! Nothing Osteen teaches about the life God has for us matches up with ANYTHING of how our Savior lived!

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Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | June 29, 2010

VIDEO SERMON: The Health and Wealth Cult by Walter Martin

Excerpt of Dr. Martin’s Lecture on “health and prosperity” ministers.

Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | June 29, 2010

VIDEO: Fr. Barron comments on the Prosperity Gospel

This is a real good and balanced teaching on biblical prosperity!!!

Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | June 28, 2010

COMPLETE VIDEO SERIES: The Many Faces of Benny Hinn

Did you ever wish you could collect and compile all the major news media’s investigative exposés on the antics of Benny Hinn? Well, now you can. The televangelist watchdog group, The Trinity Foundation, has organized three solid hours of documented, hard-hitting reports on the escapades of the controversial faith healer. It’s all you ever wanted to know about Hinn and more.

The video begins with the 1993 Inside Edition investigation of the finances and healings of the evangelist. The Inside Edition footage, the first study of Hinn by the national news media, still ranks as one of the best — if not the best — of showing Hinn at his worst. It features Hinn and his entourage trying to bully their way past Inside Edition’s news crew at the Philadelphia airport and how the Hinn ministry’s irresponsible disregard for documented healings caused them to broadcast a “fake” healing. But the Inside Edition piece is just the tip of the iceberg.

From there the video moves on to Hinn’s 1993 700 Club appearance with Pat Robertson where he laments his former ways and teachings. As the video progresses into more recent reports, much of what Hinn bemoaned to Robertson and his audience is still evident in Hinn’s life and ministry.

The collection also contains reports that would otherwise be hard or impossible to find. These include Pam Zekman’s 1993 three-part report (WBBM-ABC Chicago), the 1998 60 Minutes (Australia) segment, and Richard Ray’s 1999 two-part report (KDFW-FOX Dallas-Fort Worth). Also included are local news items from various Orlando television stations that chronicle Hinn’s problems at home. They reveal Hinn’s misfortune when he hired a private investigator to look into his ministry’s finances (and apparently found more than what Hinn bargained for) and the deaths of two of his key staff by heroin overdoses.

In all the reports, Hinn consistently groans with ignorance of the facts as to the out-of-control world he has created around himself. The astute viewer of all this will ask, “How can someone who is so in tune with the Divine (i.e., receiving personal messages from Jesus), be so out of touch with his life and ministry?”

Interspersed throughout the reports is a selection of Hinn’s most outrageous theological bloopers, including Adam was an astronaut, the Red Sea icecapades, the Holy Ghost machine gun and TBN to raise the dead. And, yes, no Benny Hinn video collection would be complete without his wife, Suzanne’s “Holy Ghost enema” and “butt-kisser” statements. Those clips are there too.

The video not only will educate and entertain, but bring most viewers to heartbreak by the revelations of how this man’s false and reckless teachings have devastated the lives of some followers.

http://www.cephasministry.com/word_of_faith_many_faces_of_%20benny_hinn.html

Posted by: TWotWoF VIDEO ROW | June 28, 2010

VIDEO: BE NOT DECEIVED

The title may look a little familiar to you.  This is the response that Winston gave to Ray after the Demon spirit in Ghostbusters fried them.  This is relevant to today in that many word of faith preachers say that we are “little gods”.  Some of the more well known preachers associated with this doctrine are Joyce Meyers, Kenneth Copeland, Kenneth Hagin, Creflo Dollar, and Bill Winston.  Some quotes from the preachers:

Hagin:  God “made us in the same class of being that he is himself”.

Copeland: “You don’t have a god in you, you are one”

Meyer:  “Now you understand I’m not saying you are God with a capital “G””.

The argument:

The “little gods” doctrine is based largely two key points. 1. God produced after his own kind, and two that God called us “gods”.   The ramifications of this doctrine are far and wide.  If we are in fact little gods, there isn’t anything on this earth that we cannot control.  Weather… no problem.  Sickness… no problem.  Whatever it is we have control of everything because we have been created as gods.  Word of faith preachers will follow these arguments up with statements of “there is divinity in humanity”, and some will say “You don’t have to go to Him (God), to take care of any problems” (This is from Bill Winston).  Anytime I listen to a sermon regarding this doctrine, I always see a high level of excitement, and the reading of these Bible verses.  Never, have I seen a pastor go into the context of the verse being used.  I get the distinct feeling that there is no thought put behind the use of these verses, rather just a superficial use of the verse to demonstrate a point that then comes off as being hollow.  As I mentioned in my previous posts, without context you can make the Bible say just about anything you want.  If you pull two obscure verses out of thin air you can warp it to mean….that you are gods on earth – Which is coincidently very similar to Mormon doctrine.  Here is what the Bible verses mean in context.

Today we will take a look at the first point…

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Posted by: Damon Whitsell | June 27, 2010

Is the Health and Wealth Gospel Biblical? by Randy Alcorn

bible promisesA writer friend was at an event many years ago when he witnessed the following: He was standing near a woman confined to a wheel chair. Suddenly a well-known woman, who had written and spoken extensively about her gift of healing, marched up to the lady in the wheelchair, dramatically laid hands on her head and prayed loudly that God would heal her, claiming God’s promises to do so.

The healer’s entourage enthusiastically agreed with the prayer, some praying in tongues. After this went on for a while, finally they backed away, and the celebrity went on to the next interview, book signing, or healing.

The woman in the wheel chair is a sister who God has shaped into the image of Christ and used mightily through her disability. When the crowd dispersed someone asked her, “Did you feel anything happen?” My friend says he heard her answer: “Yes. My neck really hurts because she pushed down on my head so hard.”

The woman in the wheel chair continues to love and serve Christ faithfully.

The woman who was certain it was God’s will to heal her, who loudly and without invitation to do so claimed her healing, either has or soon will succumb to the ultimate health problem: death.

I have seen God heal miraculously. I have also seen so-called healings which “didn’t last” the next hour or day or week, and therefore, in my opinion, were not true healings.

When it comes to healing or anything else, “What does God’s Word tell us?”

Christ’s disciples revealed their false assumptions when they asked “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” (John 9:2).

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Posted by: Damon Whitsell | June 23, 2010

Prosperity Preaching and the Stockdale Paradox

Prosperity Preaching and the Stockdale Paradox

In his 2009 book The Survivors Club: The Secrets and Science that Could Save Your Life, Ben Sherwood describes an intriguing phenomenon known as the Stockdale Paradox (after Admiral James Stockdale, the highest-ranking P.O.W. of the Vietnam War), which suggests a counterintuitive link between optimism and survival:

When [interviewer Jim Collins] asked Stockdale to explain which American prisoners did not survive captivity in Vietnam, the admiral replied, “Oh, that’s easy. The optimists.”

Collins was perplexed, but Stockdale explained that the optimists “were the ones who said ‘we’re going to be out by Christmas.’ And Christmas would come, and Christmas would go; and then Thanksgiving, and then it would be Christmas again. And they died of a broken heart.”

Stockdale went on: “This is a very important lesson. You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end — which you can never afford to lose — with discipline to confront the most brutal facts of your current reality, whatever they might be.” (41-42)

Note that according to Stockdale it isn’t optimism per se that leads to heartbreak and despair, but an optimism of baseless expectations for specific and immediate improvement. Although such optimism is always energizing at first, the excitement invariably sours to disillusionment as the optimist is faced with a stark incongruity between the world as it actually is and the world as he imagined it to be.

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Posted by: Damon Whitsell | June 23, 2010

Ex-Word of Faith Testimony: Life After the Word of Faith

Life After Word Of Faith: What To Expect

If you have recently left a word of faith church that you attended for years, you will experience a very dark season. By dark I mean finding your way from deception to the truth. Word of faith churches have very deceptive demonic forces operating within them. You will be forced to face the truth about your former pastor and many friends and family members who you love and respect. Most of these people are good people who are deceived, however, you will likely cut off communication with most of them which will leave you feeling alone and confused. You will also be forced to face everything within you that allowed yourself to be deceived. Here is my “coming out of word of faith testimony”:

I was a very dedicated word of faither for 8 years. I didn’t grow up in the church so it was the only exposure I had to the things of God. After I left, I questioned everything that I ever learned in church. I felt lost. I became cynical. I didn’t know who Jesus truly was. I had no idea what it meant to truly be saved and if anyone would have asked me I wouldn’t have been able to tell them. I went through what can only be described as de-programming. I literally felt like I had no identity during that year. Every day I watched Justin Peter’s DVD’s so I could flush out the lies that I believed and learn what the truth was. I lost the only “church family” that I had known. I stopped reading the bible because I had no idea how to study it correctly. I stopped praying. I didn’t trust anyone. I was angry beyond belief. I cried everyday. I was mad at God. I found error in everything that was taught from a pulpit even if it was being taught in context. Buzz words and cliches triggered me to the point where I felt like I was being violated. I cringed around people from my ex-word of faith church when I saw them in the community. I lost my best friend for several months because she is a word of faith minister and I couldn’t believe that she refused to hear the truth after I warned her. People gossipped about me after I left. Thankfully I left on a good note so I was not hung out to dry but people still assumed the worst. I have not been able to fully commit to a church. I cant imagine ever serving in a department at a church ever again.

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Posted by: Damon Whitsell | June 22, 2010

Ex-Word of Faith Testimony of Kevin Rhodes

Kevin is another Ex-WoFer that graduated from Rhema but now is very vocal against the Word of Faith Movement. You can see Kevins website here. ITCHING EARS
THANKS KEVIN!!!
We apologize that this testimony would not format correctly, making it hard to read.
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My name is Kevin Rhodes. Christ found me at age 12 at a local VBS.
Though I did not understand what was going on inside me I knew there was something real. Teenage life hit hard and at the age of 17 something inside was completely tired of my life and the way it was. I knew I wanted God in it. I began going to a local foursquare church with a neighbor. The church wasa very welcoming place. The majority of the members were retirees and glad to see youth like myself and friends desiring God and sharing what he was doing in our lives. I was dressed like a youth and had long hair.
Regardless of this most of the people loved us as if we were thier own children. The love of Christ truly abounded here.We were given opportunity to share often and it was encouraging. We held services and saw many peoples lives touched in a real way. God did some really cool things. As time progressed, we would join evangelistic tent meetings and revivals in our town. Most were good and fruit was evident. Some however were not.
As time passed, some in our group felt they needed more. Many were from a local Word of Faith church that had turned sour. God had brought these folks to our church and though not as “holy ghost shakin” as thiers was, they liked the people. Thier mentality was that it was not enough to walk in the love of God and see people born again, but they and the rest of us”needed” the fire. We would go twice to the Believers Convention in Fort Worth and to the Motorcycle rally sponsored all by Kenneth Copeland.

Genesis 1:26-27: Are we “Little Gods” and Other Misinterpretations
By Dr. Norman Geisler

little g godsGenesis 1:26—Does this verse indicate that there is more than one god?

Misinterpretation:
If there is only one God, why does this verse in Genesis use the word us in reference to God? Mormons often note that the Hebrew word usually translated God, Elohim, is in the plural, and the plural pronoun us is used. To them this indicates that there is more than one God: “In the very beginning the Bible shows there is a plurality of Gods beyond the power of refutation….The word Elohim ought to be in the plural all the way through—Gods” (Smith, 1976, 372).

Correcting the misinterpretation:
Several explanations for the use of the pronoun us have been offered throughout history. Some commentators have claimed that God is addressing the angels. But this is unlikely since in verse 26 God says, “Let us make man in our image,” while verse 27 makes it clear that “God created man in his own image; in the image of God he created him,” and not in the image of the angels.

Others have claimed that the plural pronoun refers to the Trinity. It is true that the New Testament (e.g., John 1:1) teaches that the Son was involved in the creation of the heavens and the earth. Also, Genesis 1:2 indicates that the Holy Spirit was involved in the creation process. However, students of Hebrew grammar point out that the plural pronoun us is simply required by the plural Hebrew noun Elohim, which is translated “God” (“Then God [Elohim, plural] said, ‘Let us [plural] make man in our [plural] image’”). Consequently, they claim that this statement should not be used to prove the doctrine of the Trinity.

Still others have asserted that the plural is used as a figure of speech called a majestic plural. Indeed, the Qur’an, which denies that there is more than one person in God, uses us of God. In this use, God is speaking to himself in such a manner as to indicate that all of his majestic power and wisdom were involved in the creation of humanity. As has been noted, the plural pronoun us corresponds to the plural Hebrew word Elohim, which is translated God. The fact that the name God is plural in Hebrew does not indicate that there is more than one God. (Queen Victoria used the plural of majesty when referring only to herself. She once commented, “We are not amused.”) A number of passages in the New Testament refer to God with the singular Greek noun theos, which is also translated “God” (for example John 1:1; Mark 13:19; Eph. 3:9). The plural nature of the Hebrew word is designed to give a fuller, more majestic sense to God’s name. It should be noted, however, that the New Testament clearly teaches that God is a Trinity (Matt. 3:16-17; 2 Cor. 13:14; 1 Peter 1:2), and, although the doctrine of the Trinity is not fully developed in the Old Testament, it is foreshadowed (cf. Ps. 110:1; Prov. 30:4; Isa. 63:7,9-10).

Genesis 1:26—Does the fact that we are created in God’s image mean that we are “little gods,” as the Word-Faith leaders say?

Misinterpretation:
Word-Faith teachers suggest that the Hebrew word for “likeness” in this verse literally means “an exact duplication in kind” (Savelle, 1990, 141). Indeed, humanity “was created on terms of equality with God, and he could stand in God’s presence without any consciousness of inferiority….God has made us as much like Himself as possible….He made us the same class of being that He is Himself” (Hagin, 1989, 35-36, 41).

Correcting the Misinterpretation:
All Genesis 1:26-27 is teaching is that humanity was created in God’s image or likeness in the sense that a human being is a finite reflection of God in rational nature (Col.3:10), in moral nature (Eph. 4:24), and in dominion over creation (Gen. 1:27-28). In the same way that the moon reflects the brilliant light of the sun, so finite humanity (as created in God’s image) is a limited reflection of God in these aspects. This verse has nothing to do with human beings becoming God or being in God’s “class.”

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